Pat Benatar / Blondie

Pat Benatar
Blondie

Pavilion
Monday, August 17, 2009
3:30 PM
Donor Gates Open
4:00 PM
Public Gates Open
7:00 PM
Concert Starts
Reserved $55
Lawn $25 ($30 on day of concert)

Program

THE DONNAS
BRETT ANDERSON, Lead Vocals
ALLISON ROBERTSON, Guitars
MAYA FORD, Bass
AMY CESARI, Drums

Intermission

PAT BENATAR
NEIL GIRALDO, Guitar and Vocals
MICK MAHAN, Bass and Vocals
MYRON GROMBACHER, Drums

Intermission

BLONDIE
DEBORAH HARRY, Vocals
CHRIS STEIN, Guitar
PAUL CARBONARA, Guitar
MATT KATZ-BOHEN, Keyboards
LEIGH FOXX, Bass
CLEM BURKE, Drums

Screen on the Lawn

About The Artist

THE DONNAS
The Donnas are for real and they are here to stay. They are a loud and proud American original. They are a band of influence, survivors in an industry known more for comet casualties than career success stories. And the Donnas really are a savvy, brazen success story; they are the American rock ’n’ roll machine. The legend began in a Palo Alto junior high school in Northern California, where four self-described “dorky preteen girls” formed a rock ’n’ roll band at the age of 13 in 1993 under the influence of KISS, Mötley Crüe and the Ramones. Over the course of the next 16 years, eight ever-evolving, critically acclaimed rock ’n’ roll albums were released. The Donnas perform all over the world for an ever-expanding, international fan base of rabid “Donnaholics,” from Palo Alto to the stages of Letterman and Saturday Night Live, and they have appeared in the pages of Rolling Stone and on the cover of Billboard. Tonight marks the Donnas’ Ravinia Festival debut.

PAT BENATAR
More than two decades ago Pat Benatar began breaking rules and blazed a new trail for female rock stars. Songs such as “Love Is a Battlefield,” “Hit Me with Your Best Shot,” “We Live for Love” and “Heartbreaker” became anthems for a new attitude. Born Patricia Andrzejewski in Brooklyn, NY, she was raised in Lindenhurst on Long Island. At 19 she married her high school sweetheart (becoming Pat Benatar) and moved to Richmond, VA, where she worked as a bank clerk and moonlighted as a singer in lounges and local clubs. In 1975 the couple moved back to New York but soon divorced. In 1977 came Benatar’s turning point. For Halloween she wore a streetwise vampire costume to a party, and instead of changing clothes for her gig that night, she went on stage in costume. Suddenly her powerful singing was matched by an equally powerful image. The following year Benatar signed to Chrysalis Records. Neil Giraldo was brought in as musician and arranger, and the two sparked an immediate rapport, later marrying. Of the nine original albums released between 1979 and 1989, seven were certified platinum and the other two went gold. During that decade she was nominated nine times for Grammy Awards and won four. She has also won three American Music Awards. In 2003 Benatar released her first album of new songs in seven years, Go, and during the last couple years she has appeared on numerous TV shows, including Charmed, Dharma and Greg and That ’80s Show. Her story has been featured on A&E’s Biography, Lifetime’s Intimate Portrait and VH-1’s series Behind the Music. Tonight marks Pat Benatar’s second appearance at Ravinia Festival, where she debuted in 2003.

BLONDIE
Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006, Blondie emerged as one of the great pop icons of New York’s late-’70s new wave punk scene by defying easy categorization. The original Blondie was formed in 1974 by art student/guitarist Chris Stein and vocalist/songwriter Deborah Harry. Drummer Clem Burke and keyboard player Jimmy Destri joined in 1975. The band played the New York downtown circuit of CBGB’s, Max’s Kansas City and Mothers, amassing a major following before recording their self-titled first album in 1976 for the Private Stock label. Over the years Blondie has produced many top hits, including “Denis,” “Picture This,” “Hanging on the Telephone,” “Sunday Girl,” “Dreaming,” “Atomic,” “Call Me,” “The Tide Is High” and “Island of Lost Souls,” their final U.S. hit before Chris was felled by a rare and often fatal genetic disease, which led to a sudden hiatus for the group. The band reformed 16 years later to play a concert and had so much fun that they decided to make some new music. Their new album, No Exit, sold more than two million units worldwide. The group’s Capitol/EMI Music Catalog Marketing release, The Best of Blondie, has been certified double platinum. One of the plaques was auctioned off to raise money to help CBGB’s club in an attempt to stave off eviction from its downtown location. In 2008 EMI celebrated the 30-year anniversary of Blondie’s Parallel Lines with a rerelease of the album that gave the band their first number-one hit in the U.S., “Heart of Glass,” and went on to sell over 20 million copies. Tonight Blondie returns to Ravinia for their second festival season, where they first appeared in 2003.