Musicians from Ravinia's Steans Music Institute

Miriam Fried, Violin
Tessa Lark, Violin
Ayane Kozasa, Viola
Deborah Pae, Cello
Nathan Vickery, Cello
Adam Golka, Piano

Bennett Gordon Hall
Saturday, April 7, 2012
7:00 PM
Gates Open
8:00 PM
Concert Starts
$10 Reserved
$8 Series of four or more concerts (Promo code FOURORMORE)
$40 Ticket & dining package (Sold Out)
$5 Students (Promo code STUDENT - ID required)

You can make the concert a complete evening out when you purchase the concert/dining package for $40 per performance. This convenient package comes complete with dinner in the Freehling Room followed by the performance in our most intimate concert space, BennettGordon Hall.

Program

Beethoven: Piano Trio in B-flat Major, Opus 11
Bernard Rands: String Quartet No. 2
Schubert: String Quintet in C Major, D. 956

About The Artist

Musicians from Ravinia’s Steans Music Institute, is a chamber ensemble whose members are selected each year from the most promising musicians to attend the institute’s summer session at Ravinia. The tour, designed to bring the musical richness of Ravinia to a wider audience, presents formal concerts as well as educational outreach programs for schools and community organizations. Musicians from Ravinia’s Steans Music Institute have appeared at such prestigious venues as Boston’s Gardner Museum, the Library of Congress, Miami’s Friends of Chamber Music series and New York’s Town Hall, in addition to performances each year on Ravinia Festival’s Rising Stars series.

Program Notes

Q&A with MIRIAM FRIED
Q: What was the best compliment you’ve received, and from whom?
A: The best compliment I ever received was from a 20-year-old who told me that my concert that he heard three years before was the first classical event he ever went to, and since that time he became an avid classical music fan.

Q: If you could have dinner with any three famous people (living or dead), who would they be?
A: I would choose Beethoven, Mozart and Schubert. This is not to say that they are necessarily my only “favorite” composers, but I can truly say that becoming acquainted with their music has changed my life.

Q: What do you do to wind down after a performance?
A: A concert is a celebration, and I do not really feel that I need to “wind down” after it. It is concerts I feel unhappy about that require postmortems and then trying to forget about them.


Q&A with TESSA LARK
Q: What is your favorite movie of all time?
A: Name any movie, and I most likely haven't seen it! Not because I’m busy, though—simply because I choose to do other things before deciding I want to watch a movie.

Q: What would be the most difficult thing for you to give up?
A: COFFEE. I think I'm addicted to it! (I would say “playing music,” but for me that would be like saying it’d be hardest to give up living.)

Q: Is there anything you miss from before you were famous?
A: I'm famous?

Q: Do you have an annoying habit?
A: When I go on road trips I tend to read aloud any and every road sign that I find amusing . . . not so amusing to my travel buddies!

Q: What do you do to wind down after a performance?
A: I love a cup of coffee after concerts. On performance days, I try not to drink any coffee in order to avoid debilitating concert jitters; but as I said before, I'm addicted to coffee, so sitting down with a delicious latte and some friends after a show, no matter how late, is my favorite way to spend post-concert hours.

Q: What is the best compliment you ever received and from whom?
A: A man once came up to me after a concert and told me that he was there with his elderly mother who for years hadn’t smiled because of severe pains she was experiencing from chronic arthritis. After I played, he said, she was grinning ear to ear; he was astonished and asked her if her pain was gone and she said, “Of course not, I feel awful—but I think I just heard the best violinist of my life!” To bring a smile back to someone's face, through such physical pain, is the most I could ask for from a performance, and certainly one of the greatest compliments I've ever encountered.


Q&A with ADAM GOLKA
Q: What is your favorite movie of all time?
A: The Big Lebowski.

Q: What would be the most difficult thing for you to give up?
A: My favorite movie.

Q: If you could have dinner with any three famous people (living or dead), who would they be?
A: Jeff Bridges, Miriam Fried, and Beethoven

Q: Is there anything you miss from before you were famous?
A: You mean infamous?

Q: What will you hope to be doing a year from now?
A: I hope to be watching the ninth season of my favorite TV show "Curb Your Enthusiasm" (I don't know if there's going to be one yet...)

Q: Do you have an annoying habit?
A: Practicing piano (according to my downstairs neighbor)

Q: What do you do to wind down after a performance?
A: Whisky

Q: What is the best compliment you ever received and from who?
A: “Great shoes!” (I can’t remember who it was.)

Q&A with Nathan Vickery
Q: What is your favorite movie of all time?
A: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.

Q: What would be the most difficult thing for you to give up?
A: Coffee.

Q: If you could have dinner with any three famous people (living or dead), who would they be?
A: J.S. Bach, C.S Lewis, and T.S. Eliot—and not just because they all go by their initials!

Q: Is there anything you miss from before you were famous?
A: I hope I'll eventually be able to get back to you on that.

Q: What will you hope to be doing a year from now?
A: Making music and watching soccer.

Q: Do you have an annoying habit?
A: Talking incessantly.

Q: What do you do to wind down after a performance?
A: Eat a lot! And talk incessantly.

Q: What is the best compliment you ever received and from who?
A: “That was really good!”—from my teacher, Peter Wiley.